A day in quarantine: house-gardening

Quarantined Home Gardening? An excellent opportunity to relax, and not only that!

by Silvia Piombo, Account Manager Bridgeman Italy

 

Silvia and her Cheese Plant

 

" I have always loved plants, and in these isolation weeks I realised that, taking care of them at home is a relaxing pastime , as well as a daily commitment. If you are alone, it will keep you company and if you have children, it can help you creating small daily and useful tasks to keep them busy."

 

Here you have the 5 golden rules to develop your green thumb:

 

1. Too much water or too little? Plants need to drink regularly but each variety has its own absorption times, so simply touch the soil every day and if it feels dry it's time to fill your watering can!

Woman watering the plants before leaving on a trip Illustration 2013 / Photo © Patrizia Laporta / Bridgeman Images

 

2. Plants like socializing. Do not be afraid to create a jungle: different varieties can happily coexist and take advantage of the same spot of light (or in the shade).

Yellow Palm, 1998 (oil on panel) © Pat Culler / Bridgeman Images
Yellow Palm, 1998 (oil on panel) © Pat Culler / Bridgeman Images

 

3. Scissors: cut the leaves, and sometimes the flowers too. If you notice that some leaves are becoming yellow, it may be the perfect time for a generous pruning. This will lighten the foliage and give the plant the opportunity to concentrate on new sprouts. If you have a potted basil, do not hesitate to cut the flowers (they attract insects).

 

 Basil (ocymum basilicum), engraving by Pier Andrea Mattioli, 1554 / Museo Civico Di Storia Naturale, Milan, Italy / De Agostini Picture Library / G. De Vecchi / Bridgeman Images
 Basil (ocymum basilicum), engraving by Pier Andrea Mattioli, 1554 / Museo Civico Di Storia Naturale, Milan, Italy / De Agostini Picture Library / G. De Vecchi / Bridgeman Images

 

4. More scissors: If your plants grow luxuriantly and at a fast pace, or if they are invading the space available more than necessary, why not make cuttings (excellent gift for when we will be able to see friends and relatives again)? Each variety has precise rules for multiplication. Hydroponic cultivation works well for houseplants such as Pothus (Devil's ivy) and Monstera (Swiss cheese plant).

 

A species of fig receives a bi-montly pruning in Managua, Managua, Nicaragua, 1944 (b/w photo) / Luis Marden/National Geographic Image Collection / Bridgeman Images
A species of fig receives a bi-montly pruning in Managua, Nicaragua, 1944 (b/w photo) / Luis Marden/National Geographic Image Collection / Bridgeman Images

 

5. It's spring, let's sow! Why not have fun trying to plant seeds from food waste such as citrus and avocado, or sprout tomatoes and garlic? And what about legumes such as lentils and beans? Have patience for a few weeks and you will soon experience the satisfaction of growing your own food as the first signs show!

 

Pomegranate, 1995 (w/c on paper)  © Margaret Ann Eden / Bridgeman Images
Pomegranate, 1995 (w/c on paper)  © Margaret Ann Eden / Bridgeman Images

 

In need of some gardening images? Check out some of our favourite home-gardening images here

 

What is your favourite pastime in these challenging times? Get in touch and let us know

 

*Please bear in mind that these are just suggestions, follow these tips sensibly and at your own discretion. Bridgeman are not liable for any damage that may arise from them.


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